Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip-hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But it’s hard to get your come up when you are labeled a hoodlum at school and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her song, which goes viral . . . for all the wrong reasons.

Bri soon finds herself in the middle of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri just doesn’t want to make it – she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.

Insightful, unflinching and full of heart, On The Come Up is an ode to hip-hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you, and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn’t always free.

I absolutely loved this book. I wish I had picked it up sooner, but there wasn’t time. The plot was phenomenal and the characters were so unique and talented. I loved the writing and wish that I could write like Angie could. Maybe one day I will.

I really liked the tone of Angie’s writing. It fit the story really well and it added a layer of vitality to the story that would probably not have been there otherwise. Angie described the setting very well and I could picture it down to how the school looked. Angie doesn’t have the most distinctive writing style, but her stories are unique. I don’t see very many other people writing stories like this. The way that Angie portrays Bri and her thoughts in this novel feels so real to me and it made Bri more relatable to me.

Bri and all of the other characters were very well-written and I wish I could have met them in real life. The characters were very diverse and I loved hearing about them. Most of them had arcs and changed in some way. I really liked how the teenagers were represented and how realistic they were. All of the characters had motives, which sometimes clashed, so the plot was moved forward. I really loved the dynamics between Bri and her family. They were very unique and I have never read anything like them. I hope that we hear more about Bri and her family in the future.

I can’t talk very much about the hip-hop aspect of the book, because I don’t normally listen to that kind of music. I don’t like rap in general, but I am sure that Angie did fine with it. I read the rap parts like I would a poem, and they seemed fine to me from that perspective. If I am wrong, please message me and I will double check.

The plot was very detailed and in-depth. It was not the easiest read, but I think it needs to be read. I wonder if this book will be turned into a movie like The Hate You Give was. It is certainty good enough. I do not live in an area like Bri, so I do not know how accurate things like gang violence and those plot details were, but I am going to assume that Angie did her research and that they were all right. Once again, if I am inaccurate in this, don’t hesitate to contact me. I really enjoyed the fact that friendships played a big part in the plot. So did family. It made everything more relatable. I love Angie’s talent and I can’t wait to see more from her.

I really loved On The Come Up and I would highly recommend. I got the book summary from the inside cover. Thanks for Reading!!! Have a Great Day!!!

XOXO

Annalee